News

Here you'll find news and articles from CPAWS Manitoba. To view full posts, please click on the corresponding titles.

Nov 22 17
Climate revenues for carbon rich conservation
Conservation of vast complexes of undisturbed boreal wetlands and forests needs to be top priority because if the carbon they hold is disturbed and released into the atmosphere, it would accelerate climate change. These complexes are also critical as natural flood mitigation infrastructure necessary for adapting to the impacts of a changing climate.

Nov 08 17
180 Days in the Wild - a presentation in conjuction with the CPAWS Manitoba AGM
It’s been a wild ride navigating the conservation challenges and opportunities of a landscape as rich and varied as the Boreal in Manitoba. We are incredibly proud of the conservation successes that we couldn’t have achieved without the generosity and passion for wild nature that our supporters exude. That’s why we want you to join us on November 22nd for a celebration of our work and the wild landscapes of Manitoba that continue to inspire us all.

Oct 06 17
Federal caribou deadline passes without provincial action
As of this month, the province of Manitoba has received over 21,000 petitions and letters collected in the province that call for stronger efforts to protect and recover threatened boreal woodland caribou. The correspondences, facilitated by the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS), were delivered in advance of yesterday’s federal deadline for provinces and territories to outline recovery actions for woodland caribou ranges.

Sep 08 17
Re: Hunting Moose in Canada to Save Caribou From Wolves (August 30, 2017)
Robert Serrouya is correct in his assertion that killing wolves to save caribou is a band-aid solution and we need to deal with the cause.

Sep 05 17
As birds head south, biodiversity is on display
A strong body of research links biodiversity to the full and healthy functioning of ecosystems, upon which people, communities and economies depend

Sep 01 17
Indigenous inclusion in NAFTA negotiations
The inclusion of Indigenous peoples from the three countries involved in its development is the right thing to do to honour nation to nation relationships while making NAFTA a better deal for all.

Aug 18 17
Saving Lake Winnipeg
I remember the moment when my heart felt what my mind already knew: our beloved Lake Winnipeg is in big trouble. This sad feeling was sparked when I overheard a woman, after reading a sign on the beach about the risks involved with swimming in the lake, tell her children she didn’t want them going in the water. They briefly walked along the shore and then left with an unopened picnic basket and unused towels in their arms.

Aug 16 17
Arctic fox dens have room to sprawl in vast intact landscape
The arctic fox raises large litters, with an average 11 pups, in dens that can have as many as 100 entrances. In contrast, my modest house has 3 doors and I often have to text my teenage daughter to find her at dinnertime. How does the Arctic Fox manage to find its little ones in these dens of many doors?

Aug 15 17
Vintage videos remind us how park creation has changed
On one hand, I am glad these areas are conserved for nature and visitor experience. On the other hand, the fact that some parks failed to include consultations with Indigenous people was terribly unjust.

Jul 24 17
Canada lags the world in land protection. Manitoba urged to commit to lands planning, new protection
In its latest annual report on the state of protected areas in Canada, the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) is calling upon Manitoba to step up efforts to preserve more land by 2020. CPAWS’ 2017 report “From Laggard to Leader? Canada's renewed focus on protecting nature could deliver results” calls Canada out for ranking last among G7 countries in the percentage of land and freshwater protected for conservation purposes, and encourages governments to accelerate the conservation of natural heritage in Canada, starting by delivering on their international commitment.

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